Month: December 2015

CCU21: A Christmas Tale (2008)

This is a special Christmas episode as we discuss some end of the year Criterion news along with Arnaud Desplechin’s 2008 A Christmas Tale, released on The Criterion Collection in 2009. Rather than a pleasant family Christmas film that fills all with glee, we have a deep, ensemble family tale with rivalries, bitterness, illness and even betrayal. It culminates with a Christmas reunion out of medical necessity. We dig deep into the film and try to explore and find answers for the divided nature of the characters.

Show notes:

Outline:

0:00 – Intro, Christmas, Housekeeping 19:00 – News 47:00 – A Christmas Tale

Intro

Upcoming Podcast Schedule

Alex Cox Indiegogo Campaign

News:

The Criterion Chronology – Letterboxd list from David Blakeslee

Criterion – National Film Registry Titles

2015 National Film Registry Titles

Tati Hulu Announcement

Lady Snowblood Hulu Announcement

Where to Stream the Best Films of 2015

The Graduate Leaving Netflix in January

Film Comment Best Films of 2015 AFI Best of 2015

Jean Eustache Controversy

Amazon 50% Sale

A Christmas Tale

Facebook Photo Album

Tim’s Post about A Christmas Tale

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: FacebookTwitter | Email 

 

The Magic Lantern: Episode 011 – Ants In Your Pants of 2015

In this episode, Ants In Your Pants of 2015, we bring you our year-in-review, but with a twist. Rather than focus exclusively on new releases, we each chose ten of our favorite film finds. These are older films that we watched for the first time this year which made the biggest impression on each of us. Some were films we had been waiting years to see, while others came as true surprises. We found that three films appeared on both of our lists, while the other selections have some particular meaning for each of us. We hope you’ll seek out these discoveries and enjoy!

Our shared favorites:
Working Girls (Arzner, 1931)
Max and the Junkmen (Sautet, 1971)
The Apu Trilogy (Ray, 1955, 1956, 1959)

Cole’s favorites:
Cousin Jules (Benicheti, 1972)
Celine and Julie Go Boating (Rivette, 1974)
Jo Jo Dancer, Your Life Is Calling (Pryor, 1986)
Alucarda (Moctezuma, 1977)
The Devils (Russell, 1971)
The Mother and the Whore (Eustache, 1973)
Belladonna of Sadness (Yamamoto, 1973)

Ericca’s favorites:
Waterloo Bridge (Whale, 1931)
The Kid with a Bike (Dardenne, Dardenne, 2011)
Wise Blood (Huston, 1979)
House (Obayashi, 1977)
Creature with the Atom Brain (Cahn, 1955)
The Killing of a Chinese Bookie (Cassavetes, 1976)
A Day in the Country (Renoir, 1936)

What you’ll find in this episode: our favorite discoveries of 2015, what we’re most excited to see in 2016, why French film is the best, pre-code delights, gems from the 1950s through the 2010s and Ericca does show tunes.

– Cole and Ericca

Links:
Cinema Guild
Alamo Drafthouse
Fantastic Fest
Austin Film Society
The Criterion Collection

CCU20: Criterion March Releases & The Best Blu-Rays of 2015

Aaron, Mark and Martin Kessler discuss the March 2016 Criterion Collection releases, and then go further by talking about our favorite Blu-Ray releases of the year. These include Criterions, but we also discuss many other boutique labels including Twilight Time, Kino Lorber, Flicker Alley, Masters of Cinema, Shout Factory, and many others.

Show notes:

Special Guest: Martin Kessler from Flixwise.

You can find him on IMDB, Twitter and Letterboxd.

Outline: 0:00 – Intro, Post-Surgery, Podcasts 18:15 – News 30:15 – March 2016 Criterion Releases 45:45 – The Best Blu-Rays of 2015

Intro:

Criterion Cast – Best of 2015 Podcast

InSession – Settling the Score

Vice Piece on Mexican Narco Cinema

News:

Boyhood hint on Instagram

Mike Leigh and Roger Pratt on Criterion Instagram

Marcel Pagnol Phantom Page

Godard’s Une Femme Mariee coming from Cohen Media

March 2016 Criterion Collection Releases

Paris Belongs to Us

The Manchurian Candidate

A Brighter Summer Day

Bicycle Thieves

A Poem is a Naked Person

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: FacebookTwitter | Email 

GTGM Episode 16: Babes In Toyland (1986)

Jamie comes to harsh realization that she never had a childhood as she was consistently required to make her own dinner…well, at least any time her mom had to put chains on the car. You know, those brutal Cincinnati winters and all. Meanwhile, Doug doesn’t understand what a PA system is.

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CCU19: A Conversation with Alex Cox

Mark and Aaron talk to Director, Screenwriter, Actor, Author (and many other titles) Alex Cox. We focus on his films in the Criterion Collection, including Repo Man, Sid & Nancy, Walker and Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas, but we delve into a lot of other interesting subjects. Most of this is just film aficionados talking to each other and sharing tastes. Alex was a candid, forthcoming, interesting and humorous guest, who were were honored to speak with.

Alex Cox

Tombstone Rashomon Indiegogo

Contact Us to get involved with Alex’s project.

Alex Cox’s Current Website

Alex Cox’s Old Website

Various topics discussed:

Alex’s Criterion Connections. His films in the Criterion Collection. Tombstone Rashomon and Crowdfunding. The casting of Sid. The cinematography of Roger Deakins and Robby Müller. Sam Peckinpah’s Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid. West Coast USA versus British Punk Scene. Werner Herzog and Klaus Kinski. His favorite films that he has made. Other films of his Criterion should release. Modern Mexican cinema. Repo Man and Kenny Rogers. Harry Dean Stanton. Lawrence Olivier, Dustin Hoffman, and method acting. Roger Corman & independent filmmaking. Fear & Loathing with Hunter S Thompson

Doc (1971), Frank Perry

15 Mexican Films You Should Stream on Netflix.

Miguel Sandoval         

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

SC6: In Cold Blood (1967)

Aaron West and David Blakeslee talk about Richard Brooks’ 1967 adaptation of the popular Truman Capote “Non-fiction Novel,” In Cold Blood. We talk about the actual crime itself and how the perpetrators are portrayed, whether accurately or not, the wide reaching influence it had, and the film language that was used in order to tell the story.

Special Guest – David Blakeslee from Criterion Reflections and The Eclipse Viewer. You can follow him on Twitter.

In Cold Blood

Facebook Photo Album

David’s Blog Post about In Cold Blood (with an interesting comment discussion)

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

The Magic Lantern: Episode 010 – Gregory’s Girl

Bill Forsyth’s Gregory’s Girl (1981) is the best teen comedy ever made and I will stand on John Hughes’ coffee table in my cowboy boots and say that. When I discovered it at age 12 it felt like it had been beamed across the Atlantic directly into my heart and brain. It is one of the first instances I can recall when a piece of art assured me that I was not just out here on my own. Legions of fans in the UK knew how I felt, as it turns out. It won the BAFTA award for Best Original Screenplay and was nominated for Best Newcomer, Best Direction and Best Film and sits at number thirty on the BFI’s list of the Top 100 British Films. On this side of the ocean, though, I felt like part of a small secret club that loved this movie. It is woefully underappreciated in the States to this day, so I chose it for this episode in hopes that there is someone out there like me thirty-two years ago that is waiting for an unassuming jewel like this to come along and teach them an important lesson or two, to reassure them or to just make their day a little better.

What you’ll find in this episode: first loves, cool kid sisters, very few authority figures, black market doughnuts, dancing versus gravity and 1/125 of an elephant.

– Cole

Links and Recommendations:
Check out Gregory’s Girl on IMDB.
Ericca’s further viewing pick of My Life as a Dog.
Cole’s further viewing pick of Comfort and Joy.
The official home page of The British Film Institute.
The Movies Made Me podcast is a great listen.
Our friends at Criterion Close-Up discuss My Life as a Dog.
If you like Scots and you like movies, you really should listen to Fuds on Film.

CCU18: Expanded News and an Announcement

Mark and Aaron have to abbreviate the episode, but we expand the news and get into what is happening not just with Criterion, but also with other films out there during awards season and that are in the wheelhouse of Criterion fans. We also finally (yes, finally) announce our special guest, who has 3.5 films in The Criterion Collection.

Show notes:

Outline:

0:00 – Intro, Housekeeping 14:55 – News

Intro, Housekeeping:

Here is Your Life – Short Cut

Met our Facebook challenge – thanks guys.

News:

Jellyfish Eyes

Speedy

Wexner Center to Showcase Criterions and a New Restoration

New York Film Critics Circle Winners

Restored Mizoguchi Masterpiece Gets an Overdue Theatrical Run

Review: Hitchcock/Truffaut Revisits the Master of Suspense

Ana Lily Amirpour Top Ten List

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

GTGM Episode 15: A Smoky Mountain Christmas (1986)

After nearly 30 years of investigation, LAPD detectives Doug and Jamie are forced to put away the case of missing country music star Lorna Davis forever. While Doug still believes she was abducted and murdered by paparazzi Harry, Jamie has never ruled out her butler Vernon as the prime suspect.

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SC5: Here Is Your Life

Aaron West discusses This Is Your Life, Jan Troell’s debut film on The Criterion Collection, which he co-write, directed, photographed, and edited. The intent was not to compare him to Bergman, but that was easier said than done. Any 1960s Swedish art film has to invoke Bergman, but this work stands alone as a historical and personal epic.

Facebook Photo Album

Where to Find Us: Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email