Month: November 2015

CCU17: Dressed to Kill (1980)

Aaron and Mark talk about Thanksgiving, Black Friday, and Brian De Palma’s 1980 sensual thriller, Dressed to Kill. We go into De Palma and how he’s just a film buff that is able to make movies, plus we investigate the expression of sexuality through therapy, and how De Palma was able to use film language to convey his character’s desires. And of course, we talk about the iconic museum scene. Show notes:

Outline:

0:00 – Intro, Housekeeping 19:00 – News 30:20 – Dressed to Kill

Intro

Criterion Fans Show Their Dedication

#BringBackMST3K Kickstarter

The Talk Film Society Podcast

Short Cuts 4: 3:10 to Yuma

Get us to 1,000 likes on Facebook

News

Entertainment Aids Alliance

Setsuko Hara: Ozu’s Quiet Muse Dies at 95.

Criterion Tribute to Ozu and Hara

Code Unknown Issue

John Waters at Criterion

Dressed to Kill

Facebook Photo Album

 

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

SC4: 3:10 to Yuma (1957)

Aaron West discusses the second in the Delmer Daves, Glenn Ford trilogy, which could be considered a “Western Noir” because of the clever shot selection, the use of light and shadow, and the multifaceted characters.

Facebook Photo Album

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

The Magic Lantern: Episode 009 – The Thing from Another World

The world changed in 1945. With the atomic bomb, a beast with unimaginable destructive power was unleashed. The world changed again in 1950 when Senator Joseph McCarthy became the face of the Red Scare. The Thing from Another World (1951) arrived shortly after, and captures a time of paranoia–both scientific and geopolitical–that would be continually reflected in hundreds of other films for another decade to come.

I could not pick a better representation of the era. It has got the script (based on the 1938 novella Who Goes There?, which would be more closely followed in John Carpenter’s The Thing in 1982), the pacing, the ensemble cast, the mounting tension and the practical effects to keep me watching the skies.

What you’ll find in this episode: a short survey of the bad, the good, and the great in atomic age films; how the rest of the world interpreted the atomic age through film; and why any movie with a sea creature is a cut above the rest.

– Ericca

Links and Recommendations:
Check out The Thing from Another World on IMDB.
Ericca’s further viewing pick of The Giant Behemoth.
Cole’s further viewing pick of Quatermass and the Pit.
Thank you to the Cinema Court and Thunder Pop podcasts for featuring us!
Here’s an interesting piece on atomic age feminism featured on Roger Ebert’s website.

CCU16: February 2016 Releases & the #CriterionBlogathon

Aaron, Mark, Kristina Dijan (Speakeasy) and Ruth Kerr (Silver Screenings) discuss the February 2016 Criterion Collection line-up and then we delve into the Criterion Blogathon, which was an epic experience for all of us. We talk about some of the behind the scenes info, give out prizes, talk about the social media thrills with the #CriterionBlogathon, and give our thanks to all who participated.

Outline: 0:00 – Intro, Housekeeping 9:20 – News & February Releases 38:40 – Criterion Blogathon

Intro

Kristina – Speakeasy Blog | Twitter Ruth – Silver Screenings Blog | Twitter

Image of 4 Month, Three Weeks, 2 Days

Facebook page

News

Dont Look Back Ruth’s Ikiru review Kristina’s In Cold Blood review Aaron’s The Apu Trilogy Review

Out1 streaming from Fandor

Kitchen Conservations: Gaspar Noé

February 2016 Releases

Criterion Cast The Newsstand

The Emigrants/The New Land

The Kid

Death by Hanging

The Graduate

I Knew Her Well

Criterion Blogathon

Recap, Day One: English Language Films released before 1947 Recap, Day Two: Europe and Mexico Recap, Day Three: English Language Films, 1947-1980. Recap, Day Four: Asian Cinema Recap.Day Five: English Language films, 1981 to present. Recap, Day Six: Essays and Box Sets.

Complete Roster

F For Films – Favorites from the Criterion Blogathon

Grand Prizes:

Research: Cinematic Scribblings Portrait: Coffee Gone Cold Originality: Criterion Affection Humorous: CineMaven’s Essays from the Couch

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

GTGM Episode 14: TRON (1982)

Doug’s new popcorn machine is the talk of the office, overshadowing the orange-transporting laser that Jamie and Blossom’s grandpa recently developed. Meanwhile, in the real world, Jamie and Doug muddle through a podcast.

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CCU15: Code Unknown & the Career of Michael Haneke

Aaron, Mark and Doug McCambridge from the Good Times, Great Movies podcast discuss this early work of Michael Haneke’s recently released on The Criterion Collection. We discuss the famous tracking shot, the way he explores culture, and of course the incomparable Juliette Binoche. We also discuss Haneke’s body of work, exploring how he works as a filmmaker, what he is trying to say, and why he is so often provocative. #ParisIsAboutLife

Show notes:

Outline:

0:00 – Intro, Housekeeping 20:00 – News 38:40 – Code Unknown 1:22:50 – Michael Haneke

Intro

Doug – iTunes | Twitter

#CriterionBlogathon preview.

News

Ryan Gallagher’s tweet about The Manchurian Candidate

Emir Kusturica

Dont Look Back packaging from Criterion Forum

The Rainer Werner Fassbinder Collection from Arrow

Code Unknown

Photo Album on Facebook.

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

SC3: Night & the City (Dassin, 1950)

Aaron and Dave Eves kick off Noirvember with a discussion about Jules Dassin’s last Hollywood film before being blacklisted and out of work. We talk about the fascinating characters of Harry, Gregorius, and many of the other supporting actors. We also discuss the actual blacklisting experience and how that materialized on the screen.

Show notes: Special guest: Dave Eves – Blog | Twitter

Where to Find Us:

Mark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | Email

The Magic Lantern: Episode 008 – No Country for Old Men

There aren’t many films more personal to me than Joel and Ethan Coen’s No Country for Old Men (2007). I grew up at the foot of the Wichita Mountains in Oklahoma, so I am intimately familiar with this scrub brush landscape and these hard-bitten, laconic plainsfolk. They are my people. That land and that mindset are never far away, as I carry that red dirt in my heart however far I may roam. My father is the thing that ties this film to me the most, though. I know that one of these days he’ll go out there ahead of me and make a fire in all that dark and all that cold and he’ll be waiting for me. It will be a privilege and a reward to sit with my old man by that fire, not having to say a thing. Until then, we carry on.

What you’ll find in this episode: fate versus self-determination, Cormac McCarthy book recommendations, how spoilers are for sissies, fathers and sons (and uncles), and how to steal two million dollars.

– Cole

Links and Recommendations:
Check out No Country for Old Men on IMDB.
Ericca’s further viewing pick of Point Blank.
Cole’s further viewing pick of Lone Star.
The official website of the Cormac McCarthy Society.
Our favorite place in west Texas, the Davis Mountains State Park.

CCU14: Blind Chance (1981) & the Mulholland Drive Aftermath

Aaron and Mark first talk about the aftermath of a monumentally popular Mulholland Drive episode, which may or may not have had a guest. We also have an extended intro and news section before delving into Krzysztof Kieślowski’s 1981 (or 1987) Blind Chance. It is a product of a volatile political time, very much a product and statement about that time, while also being an important work in the career of a respected international auteur.

Show notes:

Outline:

0:00 – Intro, Mulholland Drive Aftermath, Housekeeping 25:00 – News 45:40 – Blind Chance

Intro

Trevor – Blog | Twitter

Criterion Blogathon – Schedule

News

Julien Duvivier in the Thirties

David Lynch Shorts post 

Christian Petzold

Where to Find Us:

Criterion Close-Up: Facebook | Twitter | EmailMark Hurne: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd Aaron West: Twitter | Blog | Letterboxd

GTGM Episode 13: Young Guns (1988)

Doug has a beef outfit and a store. Jamie has a beef outfit and a store. Doug’s going to try and make money. Jamie’s going to try and make money. It’s simple and it’s fair.

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